What happened to all the money in the Great Depression?

What happened to all the money in the Great Depression?

As the economic depression deepened in the early 30s, and as farmers had less and less money to spend in town, banks began to fail at alarming rates. It’s estimated that 4,000 banks failed during the one year of 1933 alone. By 1933, depositors saw $140 billion disappear through bank failures.

What would happen if the US economy collapsed?

If the U.S. economy collapses, you would likely lose access to credit. Banks would close. Demand would outstrip supply of food, gas, and other necessities. If the collapse affected local governments and utilities, then water and electricity might no longer be available.

Can the banks take your money?

The truth is, banks have the right to take out money from one account to cover an unpaid balance or default from another account. So if you have two accounts with Wells Fargo, and one defaults, the bank has the right to take money out of another on of your accounts to cover the difference.

How much cash should you keep in the bank?

Most financial experts end up suggesting you need a cash stash equal to six months of expenses: If you need $5,000 to survive every month, save $30,000. Personal finance guru Suze Orman advises an eight-month emergency fund because that’s about how long it takes the average person to find a job.

Can you lose money on a savings account?

Yes, savings account over a long period of time can lose you money. You may have the physical cash but the purchasing power of that cash has diminished and there is nothing any of us can do about it. Inflation is actually a good thing when it is balanced and so far, it is just a fact of life that isn’t going anywhere.

Can government take money from your bank account?

Only debts like federal student loan and unpaid income taxes can be garnished out of your accounts or wages without a court order. They can take it out of existing money your bank accounts and/or out of your paychecks (i.e. wage garnishment).